Zoë Sinel, ‘Book Review: Stephen A Smith, Rights, Wrongs, and Injustices: The Structure of Remedial Law

Stephen A Smith, Rights, Wrongs and Injustices: The Structure of Remedial Law (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2020). Allan Beever has recently reminded reviewers of the importance of identifying a book’s intended audience when interpreting its claims. It is safe to say that Stephen Smith’s intended audience for Rights, Wrongs, and Injustices: The Structure of Remedial Law is me – and others who, like me, sometimes doubt the coherence of private law’s remedies. Often these occasional misgivings are born of the effort to teach material that contains a yawning divide between remedies that provide specific relief (for example, specific performance, injunctions) and those that merely provide monetary compensation (that is, damages). In the opening pages of Rights, Wrongs, and Injustices, Smith describes this struggle as the pedagogical puzzle posed by remedial law, admitting that it initially left him seeing the law of remedies as ‘a hodgepodge of miscellaneous topics’ …

Zoë Sinel, Book Review: Stephen A Smith, Rights, Wrongs, and Injustices: The Structure of Remedial Law, University of Toronto Law Journal volume 72, no 1, https://doi.org/10.3138/utlj-2021-0066.br. Published Online: November 1, 2021.

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