‘A COVID-19 Quandary: Does a Force Majeure Clause Displace the Frustration Doctrine?’

“The frustration (or ‘frustration of purpose’) doctrine excuses a party from its contractual obligations when an extraordinary event completely undermines its principal purpose in making the deal. Historically, the doctrine has played a marginal role in contract law, as parties very rarely invoked it – and almost always without success. Courts are understandably reluctant to relieve parties from their contracts and will only do so in very unusual cases. Thus, frustration has long been an obscure doctrine, taught in law schools but infrequently litigated in court …” (more)

[Andrew A Schwartz, Oxford Business Law Blog, 8 April]

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