Monthly Archives: May, 2017

Call for Papers: Modern Studies in Property Law 2018: University College London, 10-12 April 2018

The 12th Biennial MSPL Conference will be held at the newly refurbished Bentham House, home of the UCL Faculty of Laws, from Tuesday 10th April to Thursday 12th April 2018. A dedicated Post-Graduate Research strand will be held on Thursday 12th April: further details and a call for papers for this strand will be released […]

‘Studying Specific Performance’

Yonathan A Arbel, Contract Remedies in Action: Specific Performance, 118 West Virginia Law Review 100 (2015), available at SSRN. Parties that have a right to the very thing promised in a contract may opt not to have it delivered by the breaching party through specific performance. Even when the promised item is unique, the plaintiff […]

Rothstein and Rothstein, ‘The Use of Genetic Information in Real Property Transactions’

With the cost of genome sequencing continuing to decline and genomic information becoming more common in health records, it is foreseeable that entities with an economic interest in the future health status of individuals will be tempted to use predictive genetic information to assess the health risks of individuals who are parties to real property […]

Nicos Stavropoulos, ‘The Debate that Never Was’

The ‘Hart-Dworkin’ debate, which is widely understood to have dominated jurisprudence since the late 1960s, is a philosophical fiction. Hart only responded to Dworkin’s work in his Postscript to the Concept of Law (posthumously published in 1994), and although Dworkin wrote a rejoinder at the time, it had remained to this day unpublished. (It is […]

‘A comprehensive look at Brexit’s impact on intellectual property rights in the UK’

“The formal process for the UK’s departure from the EU began on 29 March 2017 when the UK Government notified the European Council under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty of its intention to leave the EU. This started a two year period in which to negotiate a withdrawal agreement (this period can be extended […]

David Blankfein-Tabachnick, ‘Property, Duress, and Consensual Relationships’

Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law. By Seana Valentine Shiffrin. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press. 2014. Pp. xi, 223. $35. Professor Seana Valentine Shiffrin has produced an exciting new book, Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law. Shiffrin’s previous rigorous, careful, and morally sensitive work spans contract law, intellectual property, and […]

‘A Pragmatist’s View of Promissory Law with a Focus on Consent and Reliance’

This article discusses Professor Nate Oman’s excellent new book, The Dignity of Commerce, which makes an impressive case for how markets can produce ‘desirable’ outcomes for society. In addition to a comprehensive account of what he calls ‘virtues’ of markets, such as their tendency to produce cooperation, trust, and wealth, the book is full of […]

Professor of Law, Brunel Law School

“… The appointed person will have teaching and preferably research interests in any aspect of Private Law (broadly defined). The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Our preference is for a candidate who can offer research and teaching in one or more of the following areas: […]

Iain Field, ‘A good-faith challenge to the taxonomy of tort law defences’

Introduction: … The argument develops incrementally in five substantive parts. Part II outlines the range of circumstances in which good faith ‘protections’ (to use a neutral term that encompasses, but is not limited to, the possible definitions of ‘defences’ examined later in this article) operate in tort law, and demonstrates why – subject to the […]

‘Research Fellowships in Legal History at St Andrews’

“Four Research Fellowships in Legal History are available at the University of St Andrews to work with Professor John Hudson on the ERC Advance Grant funded project ‘Civil Law, Common Law, Customary Law: Consonance, Divergence and Transformation in Western Europe from the late eleventh to the thirteenth centuries’ …” (more) [Legal History Blog, 22 May]