Category Archives: Personal Injuries

Watson and Kottenhagen, ‘Patients’ Rights, Medical Error and Harmonisation of Compensation Mechanisms in Europe’

Abstract: In 1999 the Institute of Medicine reported that most medical injuries relate to unavoidable human error in a context of system failure. Patient safety improves when healthcare providers facilitate blame-free reporting and organisational learning. This is at odds with fault-based civil liability law, which discourages a more open (doctor-patient) communication on medical injuries. The […]

Emma Cave, ‘The ill-informed Consent to medical treatment and the therapeutic exception’

Abstract: Affirming the doctrine of informed consent, the UK Supreme Court in Montgomery v Lanarkshire HB belatedly followed the Australian decision of Rogers v Whitaker, decoupling the duty to inform patients about the material risks of medical treatment from Bolam. The underlying commitment to patient autonomy coincides with a wider body of medical law that […]

‘Cost of NHS negligence claims likely to double by 2023, says study’

“The annual cost to the NHS in England of settling clinical negligence claims is equivalent to training 6,500 doctors and is expected to double by 2023, according to the Medical Protection Society. Further increases in the £1.5bn bill will render such payments unsustainable and divert significant amounts of funding away from frontline patient care, the […]

Denise Meyerson, ‘Medical Negligence Determinations, the “Right to Try”, and Expanded Access to Innovative Treatments’

Abstract: This article considers the issue of expanded access to innovative treatments in the context of recent legislative initiatives in the United Kingdom and the United States. In the United Kingdom, the supporters of legislative change argued that the common law principles governing medical negligence are a barrier to innovation. In an attempt to remove […]

Juergen Backhaus, ‘Lawyers’ economics versus economic analysis of law: a critique of professor Posner’s “economic” approach to law by reference to a case concerning damages for loss of earning capacity’

Abstract: A methodological critique of the Chicago School of legal economic analysis, in particular Posner’s approach, is illustrated by an example characterizing Chicago-type ‘analysis of law’. Although the discussion of the example referred to may be interesting in its own right, its purpose here is to suggest a more general framework of criticism in order […]

Sabrina Safrin, ‘The C-Section Epidemic: What’s Tort Reform Got to Do with It?’

Abstract: Today one in three babies in the United States comes into the world by cesarean section. The cesarean section has become the most commonly performed operating room procedure in the United States. Conventional wisdom holds that malpractice liability bears primary responsibility for the cesarean section epidemic and that tort reform, which caps physician liability, […]

‘Is a dog a product?’

“The Abnormal Use blog is reporting on an interesting story about a lawsuit against a Humane Society pet shelter based on the fact that a dog adopted from the agency bit a 15-month old child. What is interesting is that the cause of action is based on product liability principles. The case apparently argues that […]

Richard Lewis, ‘Industrial Injuries Compensation: Tort and Social Security Compared’

Abstract: This article highlights aspects of the tort system of compensation for personal injury in the UK by comparing the provision made for workers under the state’s industrial injury scheme. The relative significance of the two schemes has rarely been considered and has not been dealt with in any UK law journal. Although lawyers are […]

Richard Lewis, ‘Tort Tactics: An Empirical Study of Personal Injury Litigation Strategies’

Abstract: This article reveals some of the tactics which lawyers may use when conducting personal injury litigation. The research is empirically based by being drawn from structured interviews with a cross section of practitioners. This qualitative evidence helps to place the rules of tort in a wider context and suggests that tactical considerations may affect […]

‘The Case Against National Medical Malpractice Reform’

“Nobody wants medical tort reform more than me. As a surgeon in private practice for over 30 years, I feel the sting of exorbitant malpractice insurance premiums. I hear tales in the hospital doctors’ lounge of frivolous lawsuits, of suits brought by ungrateful and misinformed patients, of doctors torn between feelings of compassion and fear […]